Unnkerr Swéghléoðras: Part 1 — Distant Melodies

So Grooveshark was shut down two weeks ago on Friday, forever. Together with its playlists, databases and broadcasts. I still haven’t completely gotten over it. Yet my knowledge and passion for music remains—so I thought I might employ a similar tactic to Rich Aftersabbath and release my own one hour mixes of songs from different artists. Rich has done a great job of compiling rare heavy psych, yet it doesn’t always need to be rare, heavy or psych, does it?

This first release is called Distant Melodies and consists solely of progressive material. For now, the medium I’m using is Youtube, perhaps later I’ll change to something better. I’ve tried to choose best quality I could find. Enjoy!

Unnkerr Swéghléoðras: Part 1 — Distant Melodies

Track listing:

  1. Weed — My Dream
  2. Yes — Then
  3. Starcastle — Diamond Song (Deep is the Light)
  4. Julian Jay Savarin — Child of the Night
  5. Emerson Lake & Palmer — In the Beginning
  6. Jade Warrior — Lady of the Lake
  7. Camel — La Princesse Perdue
  8. Greenslade — Sundance
  9. Caravan — But Where for the Caravan Would I?
  10. Premiata Forneria Marconi — Impressioni di Settembre

Play time: 1h 3min 34s

If you have a moment to spare, I would love to hear your thoughts on this project. Thanks!

 

Next release: Unnkerr Swéghléoðras: Part 2 — The Dark Book of Love

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Queen — Queen (album)

QueenQueen (album)
★★★

Queen sure are a difficult band. For every part on their debut album that I loved, there was a part that I hated. A ratio of one poor song to one great piece is not a bad one, you might think, but I would have been relieved if that were the case, since the instances of enjoyment and disgust occurred multiple times within each of the songs. How am I supposed to deal with that? Doing All Right and Liar are both examples of pieces that start off the wrong foot, but correct their stance as they move on. Also, it is easy to understand how Queen got their attention and fame; their sound is unique and the musical skills of the band’s members are unquestionable, even though those two traits combined do not necessarily add up to good music.

Iron Butterfly — Ball

Iron ButterflyBall
★★★☆

This is the third album by Iron Butterfly, in which they continue to practice their art as the pioneers of heavy psych. In spite of the trademark distorted guitar and organs, the sound on this album is warm and gentle, yet might appear somewhat monotonous to some, since the songs are lacking hooks to be remembered by. Still, this is a more than fitting chill-out album suitable for a lazy mood, one that soothes your mind on the background while not asking for any unnecessary attention.

Pentangle — The Pentangle

Pentangle — The Pentangle
★★★★☆

I’ve been meaning to write about these guys for a while already. One day I went searching for more bands like Fairport Convention and Steeleye Span — folk rock with a strong female lead — and it’s no wonder that I found Pentangle. What they do is they mix things together. On the 5 ends of their pentangle star you can find folk, rock, blues, even jazz, and finally some magic of their own. Their debut album The Pentangle brought something new to my life, and that’s the thing I cherish most.

Pink Fairies — Finland Freakout

Pink FairiesFinland Freakout
★★★

Finland mentioned! Therefore I just had to listen to this live album. The performance in question was recorded back in 1971 on the annual Finnish rock festival in Turku that is called Ruisrock (translates literally as Rye Rock), but the live album was only released recently in 2008.

I don’t know whether it had something to do with the quality of the recording, but it turned out to be just noise for the most part, even if a pleasing noise of a sort. Yet the noise had reached its momentary perfection during the guitar solo in Uncle Harry’s Last Freakout, where the distortion levels just killed my ears, but the experience was definitely worth all the damage taken. Listen to it at your own risk! For a quick access to the ear killing part you can scroll to 8.20 in the song.

Eloy — Eloy (album)

EloyEloy (album)
★★★☆

This is the eponymous debut album by the German symphonic rock band Eloy, released in 1971. Later on they have adopted a more melodical approach to music, but in this album they still sound close to what most Krautrock bands did: crude and powerful. Yet, even though I usually like this “raw” sound, here it gets somewhat tiresome, feels somehow out of place, and the compositions feel like they are missing something instead. Due to this reason I couldn’t pick any track that would actually shine amongst others. Nevertheless, I quite enjoyed this album, and I’m keen on exploring Eloy‘s other works as well.

Iron Butterfly — In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida (album)

Iron ButterflyIn-A-Gadda-Da-Vida (album)
★★★★☆

This album is widely known by its 17 minute B-side epic of the same name. Yet the A-side tunes don’t disappoint either, and the album ensures a fully fledged heavy psych experience. There was one song which I didn’t quite like though, called Termination. Oddly enough, upon investigating the matter it revealed to be the only track which wasn’t composed by Doug Ingle, the pianist and lead vocalist of the band.

Since everyone has heard In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida anyway (in case you haven’t, tend to it at once!), I’m putting another song from this album for display. Are you happy?