Hey Conductor

Great song from 1967, which was becoming very popular until some bright soul grokked drug references, and radio stations took the song out of circulation. Drug references in rock music from 1967, seriously?

 

Pentangle — The Pentangle

Pentangle — The Pentangle
★★★★☆

I’ve been meaning to write about these guys for a while already. One day I went searching for more bands like Fairport Convention and Steeleye Span — folk rock with a strong female lead — and it’s no wonder that I found Pentangle. What they do is they mix things together. On the 5 ends of their pentangle star you can find folk, rock, blues, even jazz, and finally some magic of their own. Their debut album The Pentangle brought something new to my life, and that’s the thing I cherish most.

Pink Fairies — Finland Freakout

Pink FairiesFinland Freakout
★★★

Finland mentioned! Therefore I just had to listen to this live album. The performance in question was recorded back in 1971 on the annual Finnish rock festival in Turku that is called Ruisrock (translates literally as Rye Rock), but the live album was only released recently in 2008.

I don’t know whether it had something to do with the quality of the recording, but it turned out to be just noise for the most part, even if a pleasing noise of a sort. Yet the noise had reached its momentary perfection during the guitar solo in Uncle Harry’s Last Freakout, where the distortion levels just killed my ears, but the experience was definitely worth all the damage taken. Listen to it at your own risk! For a quick access to the ear killing part you can scroll to 8.20 in the song.

Pink Fairies — What a Bunch of Sweeties

Pink FairiesWhat a Bunch of Sweeties
★★★★

My understanding can’t cope with someone who would rate this album with 2.5/5 stars on Allmusic. Maybe he had a problem with Uranus: the album features two funny tracks that may disturb the musical experience. Another reason for such a low score might be, that the A-side of the record features the guys experimenting with the traditional rock’n’roll scheme, while on the B-side their style changes to proto-metal, and quite abruptly so. In spite of all that, this album rocks! The amount of juicy guitar is overwhelming — be sure to check it out.

 

The Day After the Sabbath

Today, I stumbled upon a playlist on Grooveshark named The Day After the Sabbath, over 700 songs. I was surprised to find out it had many rare hard rock classics in it, going towards metal. Plenty of screaming guitars and furious drumming skills. After listening to about 25 songs, I failed to hear even one that would have displeased my taste — instead, I found about 10 new bands to check out later.

Upon further investigation, I found the site from which the songs were taken: http://www.aftersabbath.com/ . It features more than 100 compilation albums (and counting!), made by a guy named Rich. All the compilation albums can apparently be downloaded from there. And if you’re reluctant to do so, you can find the first 5o albums, which should be quite enough for starters, on the following playlist: http://grooveshark.com/playlist/Day+After+The+Sabbath/79920718

Happy listening!

Eloy — Eloy (album)

EloyEloy (album)
★★★☆

This is the eponymous debut album by the German symphonic rock band Eloy, released in 1971. Later on they have adopted a more melodical approach to music, but in this album they still sound close to what most Krautrock bands did: crude and powerful. Yet, even though I usually like this “raw” sound, here it gets somewhat tiresome, feels somehow out of place, and the compositions feel like they are missing something instead. Due to this reason I couldn’t pick any track that would actually shine amongst others. Nevertheless, I quite enjoyed this album, and I’m keen on exploring Eloy‘s other works as well.